Happy Birthday Song Mei-ling

Today, March 4th, is the birthday of Song Meiling, daughter of one of the wealthiest families in China.  Born in China, educated in America, and married to General Chiang Kai-shek.  Her two other sisters had equally glorious lives, one married into a family of equally great wealth and worldwide interests in banking. The other, Qingling, married Dr. Sun Yat-sen, a revolutionary and the first president China.

Song Meiling was beautiful and well-spoken, and was well-known to people around the world during the World War II as she and her husband rallied support from the allied governments, fought against the Japanese invaders, and tried stop the rise of the communists China.  They fought bravely, but a great number of communist sleeper spies planted in many parts of the government and military just got up joined the communists in their fight for power.  Song Qingling stayed in China. Song Meiling and Chiang Kai-shek and their nationalist loyalists retreated to the island of Taiwan to re-arm and re-take China.  It never happened. She died a recognized war hero in NYC at the age of 106 years old.

Here is her story.  An interesting read.

http://www.456fis.org/MADAME_CHIANG_KAI-SHEK.htm

 

Chinese New Years Has Not Passed Until Lantern Festival 15 Days After Lunar New Year

An old taxi driver told me for the old folks Chinese New Years hasn’t passed until the 15 lunar day after the Lunar New Year. That day is known as Lantern Festival.  Actually, Lantern Festival is more of a kick than Chinese New Years. There are lantern making contests and eating round moon-shaped dumplings.

Enjoy this Slide Show on  Lantern Festival.

http://www.slideshare.net/jamessteed/happy-lantern-festival

2010 Lantern Festival in Chengdu

Sending Your Wishes in the Sky in Taiwan

Here is how to make a simple Chinese lantern with red construction paper, pink paper, scissors, ruler, and tape.

 

 

China in 10 Minutes

Here is a quick summary of information about China.  Straight forward.  It could prove to be a nice little outline and lead in to a two or three-hour discussion about China. You need pretty good English and a little familiarity with English as it is spoken by Chinese.  (You will notice the LV trademark has been conveniently copied as the opening frame!)  Ah, China!

 

Qian Ren Qing and Social Obligation

Chinese relationships can get very complicated, especially when they teeter on who owes who?  Accepting help, favors, gifts, and even compliments can mean that you qiàn rénqíng  ( 欠 人 清 ) “owe someone something (e.g. a favor).”   Asking for favors can put you in debt to someone, and sooner or later you may be expected to reciprocate.  Fulfilling your “social obligations” is important. It maintains “your face.” Doing favors, giving gifts, or even paying compliments, on the other hand, can in debt someone to you. In business, it similar to “building goodwill.”

You can avoid owing too much to others by restricting your requests for help, reciprocating with gifts of equal value, and deflecting compliments using na3 li3 “where” or other humble, self-depreciating, or compliment-passing techniques.  However, be careful.  If someone truly does owe you a big favor or wants to put on a big show, then it might cause him to “lose face” if you refuse help or refuse a gift. A gift is always pondered very carefully–”how much it is worth, what is it expressing, what are they re-paying me for, is it an appropriate gift considering my relationship with them, and even what do they want in return?”  It may sound very shallow to you, but it is, in fact, easier to handle because keeping a list is easier than trying to ascertain how deep allegiances and friendships are.

Therefore, this giving and receiving helps maintain “face” and “validates friendships.”

How to Form a Company in China

 

Dave at Chinese Hacks introduced the following article, How to Form a Company in China, as something might be interested in.  You may, too.

Here is a link to an article in the China Law Blog titled How to Form a Company in China. The article covers the follow areas: (1) Make Sure Your Business is Legal For Foreigners.  (2) Provide The Proper Documentation.   (3) Investor Documents Needed.  (4) Consider Forming a Special Purpose Company to Own the WFOE.  (5) Secure Chinese Government Approval.  (6) Compile and Provide These Documents for Chinese Government Approval.  (7) Compile and Provide These Additional Documents for Chinese Government Approval.  (8) The Approval Process.   Good overall view.  I imagine the people associated with the blog can provide the nuts and bolts of it all.